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Rhythm for the foodies
#1
   
Seen this and thought it might work for me

what do you think???
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#2
(22-08-2017, 07:28 AM)Alcluith Wrote: Seen this and thought it might work for me

what do you think???

I've seen/heard this idea being used in traditional fiddle classes and if it works for the learner then it is a valuable teaching tool.  You can even invent your own wee phrases - what about "Haggis and tatties and neeps ", or a Scottish favourite "Deep-fried Mars Bar"?

If you are not a fluent reader of standard notation then it offers an alternative to the "1-and-2 and..." and "1-and-a-2 and-a" ...methods of counting.

Try it, Drew, and if it works, embrace it!
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#3
Thanks for this; I hadn't seen it before. As each language has its own consonant and vowel lengths, there are a plethora of equivalents to your foodie one, but one of the classic ones (possibly the oldest in existence?) is TAKADIMI - see http://takadimi.net/ In particular check out the short guide there (4th one down in the index on the LHS). Unlike 1-e-and-a 2-e-and-a etc. it can easily be used to breakdown complex timing bars involving demisemiquavers etc., and is also useful when different timings are played against each other, e.g. triplets against semiquavers.
Cheers, Eric
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#4
(22-08-2017, 03:23 PM)Eric R Wrote: Thanks for this; I hadn't seen it before. As each language has its own consonant and vowel lengths, there are a plethora of equivalents to your foodie one, but one of the classic ones (possibly the oldest in existence?) is TAKADIMI - see http://takadimi.net/ In particular check out the short guide there (4th one down in the index on the LHS). Unlike 1-e-and-a 2-e-and-a etc. it can easily be used to breakdown complex timing bars involving demisemiquavers etc., and is also useful when different timings are played against each other, e.g. triplets against semiquavers.
Cheers, Eric
Hi Eric

I'm from the old school where we got tati  but all I remember ta ta taffitifi ta, that was before I was thrown out the music class, so it never really went any further.

cheers

Drew
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#5
"...that was before I was thrown out the music class..."

Mmmm... I wonder if that would work?
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#6
I have an instructional videodisc for the oud where the teacher uses personal names common to Turkish and Arabic - Mohammed, Mustafa etc.

"Nigel Gatherer" is a pretty good mnemonic for 5/4.
http://www.campin.me.uk/
07895 860 060
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