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Scottish Session
#1
I have been trying for a little while now to revive this Forum, but with very little success. Just a small core of people post here despite having  46 registered members.

As I final attempt I was thinking about a Scottish Session list, This is my collection  which I have included songs as well as tunes - what's would be yours.

Kismaul's Galley
Arran Boat
Galley of Lorne
Road to Drumleman
Soup Dragon
Smiling Spring
St Kilda Wedding
Greylag Geese
Norlan Wind
Halloween
Kenmure's on or Awa'
Tramps and Hawkers
Calum's Road
Green and Blue
Boy's Lament for his Dragon
Robertson's Reel
Hurlock's Reel
Up the Norland Water
Setting Course for Lewis
Loch Tay Boat Song
Lochanside
O' Gin I were a Baron Heir
Braes o' Killiecrankie
Bottom of the Punch Bowl
Hugh the Graeme
High Road to Linton
The Spark among the Heather
Song of the Chanter
Flett frae Flotta
Redesdale Hornpipe
Glasgow Hornpipe
The Cuckoo
Leaving Barra
Music o' Spet
Water of Kylesku
Davie Knick Knack
Dark Island
Smile in your Sleep
We're no awa tae Bide awa.

cheers

Alcluith
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#2
Interesting selection, Drew, and I imagine if anyone else responds there will be quite wide variation in the selections. Being a westcoaster based in Argyll my selection would probably include more pipe tunes, especially 2/4 and 6/8 marches. In our weekly open session in a local pub we have guitars, mandolins, fiddles, accordions, small pipes, concertina, flute and whistles, and each player brings something a bit different, with the result that our repertoire can vary though there is a sort of hard core of tunes played regularly. Our concertina player adds in a strong Irish element while the accordions tend to favour pipe tunes, Gaelic waltzes, etc.

I play too with a group of fiddlers on a regular basis and here the repertoire is probably much wider, and as the fiddlers are almost all members of fiddle workshops often the tunes come from whatever the tutor has been teaching them recently.

Let's see what transpires, if anything.
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#3
(12-02-2020, 12:53 PM)John Kelly Wrote: Interesting selection, Drew, and I imagine if anyone else responds there will be quite wide variation in the selections.  Being a westcoaster based in Argyll my selection would probably include more pipe tunes, especially 2/4 and 6/8 marches.  In our weekly open session in a local pub we have guitars, mandolins, fiddles, accordions, small pipes, concertina, flute and whistles, and each player brings something a bit different, with the result that our repertoire can vary though there is a sort of hard core of tunes played regularly.  Our concertina player adds in a strong Irish element while the accordions tend to favour pipe tunes, Gaelic waltzes, etc.

I play too with a group of fiddlers on a regular basis and here the repertoire is probably much wider, and as the fiddlers are almost all members of fiddle workshops often the tunes come from whatever the tutor has been teaching them recently.  

Let's see what transpires, if anything.

Hi John

Yes its stuff I have been learning from many sources, including your good self, Nigel and some of my brother's from his playing back in the 70s.

Sadly we do not have a local session, I was with a mandolin group in Alexandria, but mostly mandolin and not really an open session.
Was hoping for a Dumbarton session but it has never materialised.

Also sadly despite our best attempts I think this forum is not going to take off anytime soon.

I was hoping that the Scottish Mandolin website would be a good option but again it seams to have died. I have offered to take over the site but no response to date, it might still happen, but I have been thinking about starting a new site at some point.


cheers

Drew
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#4
Running a website is a major undertaking, Drew. I had one up for a few years just after I retired in 2003 from my teaching career. It was JKMandolins and I put it up to let people see what I was building when I began my instrument building after I had attended the great course at Anniesland College. I had no forum but just had photos of what I was building and a link to Soundcloud where I put up recordings of the instruments to let folk hear what they sounded like. I had a wee section for folk to leave comments but I quickly found that even on the tiny scale I was working on it was very time-consuming to keep the site up to date with new pictures, etc. I felt there was no point in having a site that never updated.
I am always amazed at how well Nigel has kept this site active, in spite of his full-time teaching commitments and a big problem a few years ago when the site went down and he had to start again, basically from scratch. The free tunes archive and other things he offers are such a great resource, and hats off to him for all his efforts.
What I am saying is to think very long and hard before you commit yourself to taking on a site or setting one up. You may well already have a lot of experience and knowledge of web authoring - I was coming to it from no knowledge. Good luck if you decide to go ahead with your idea.
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#5
(14-02-2020, 06:50 PM)John Kelly Wrote: Running a website is a major undertaking, Drew.  I had one up for a few years just after I retired in 2003 from my teaching career.  It was JKMandolins and I put it up to let people see what I was building when I began my instrument building after I had attended the great course at Anniesland College.  I had no forum but just had photos of what I was building and a link to Soundcloud where I put up recordings of the instruments to let folk hear what they sounded like.  I had a wee section for folk to leave comments but I quickly found that even on the tiny scale I was working on it was very time-consuming to keep the site up to date with new pictures, etc.  I felt there was no point in having a site that never updated.  
I am always amazed at how well Nigel has kept this site active, in spite of his full-time teaching commitments and  a big problem a few years ago when the site went down and he had to start again, basically from scratch.  The free tunes archive and other things he offers are such a great resource, and hats off to him for all his efforts.  
What I am saying is to think very long and hard before you commit yourself to taking on a site or setting one up.  You may well already have a lot of experience and knowledge of web authoring - I was coming to it from no knowledge.  Good luck if you decide to go ahead with your idea.
John
I agree that running a website, is a lot of work and a Forum even mores. I did web design for a good few years, and was one of the founders and administrators of the "TalkingScot" Ancestry Forum, all as you say very time consuming. 
As long as Nigel's site is online then I do not think we need another, but it would be good to try to get the forum more active, I know the Mandolin Cafe's "Song of the Week" has a nucleus of regular posters, but it is active and has a lively exchange of ideas and encouragement., if only this Forum was the same, which I guess needs the members being more active, it's just getting the right format to spark interest.

Drew
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