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Gatherer's Grand Collection - nigelgatherer - 08-08-2016

In my idle moments I've put together two new digital books, the first two volumes of what I'm calling "Gatherer's Grand Collection". The contents are mostly in sets of two or three tunes, they're all Scottish, and they're all tunes I like. At the moment they only exist in standard notation, but mandiolin tab versions will appear at some point.

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the First

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the Second

Any problems with downloading, let me know.

Nigel


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - John Kelly - 11-08-2016

These are already causing great delight to lots of folk and there has been a lot of activity over on the Mandolin Cafe site as a result of Nigel's very generous provision.

Apart from adding my thanks, I just wanted to see if I could be among the first to post on the new forum now that I have got access once again.  Been missing the chat for so long and it's great to be active here again. Tongue


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - Eric R - 11-08-2016

(11-08-2016, 11:22 AM)John Kelly Wrote: These are already causing great delight to lots of folk and there has been a lot of activity over on the Mandolin Cafe site as a result of Nigel's very generous provision.

Apart from adding my thanks, I just wanted to see if I could be among the first to post on the new forum now that I have got access once again.  Been missing the chat for so long and it's great to be active here again.  Tongue

Hi John,

Well done on being the 'gold medal' replier! I tried to reply earlier but for some odd reason I couldn't get the 'reply' feature to work on my PC.

Yes, Nigel's books are a huge resource, and from a personal point of view I gain a huge amount from them by just chuntering through my now large collection for part of each mandolin-day. May just be me, but I find I get a great deal more from playing them andante rather than the presto often heard in the speed-fuelled sessions I go to.

I hope life treats you well.

Best wishes,
Eric


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - John Kelly - 11-08-2016

Welcome back, Eric.  You must have just taken the Silver, so two to Scotland on the first day of the Nigel Games!

Glad you are another who likes the steady approach to our Scottish tunes.  I find this especially with pipe tunes and 6/8 marches which are often transformed into fast jigs by many of our modern, technically-gifted young players.

John


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - JAJ - 24-08-2016

Thanks for the resources , Nigel.

Good to see you again, Eric and John.

I enjoy my own pace too although some tunes are better at a good pace. However, marches and the like are better at a steady pace. It gives you an opportunity to be more expressive and put your "own mark" on them. Something you can never really do in a fast session.


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - Alistair - 31-08-2016

(08-08-2016, 08:39 PM)nigelgatherer Wrote: In my idle moments I've put together two new digital books, the first two volumes of what I'm calling "Gatherer's Grand Collection". The contents are mostly in sets of two or three tunes, they're all Scottish, and they're all tunes I like. At the moment they only exist in standard notation, but mandiolin tab versions will appear at some point.

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the First

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the Second

Any problems with downloading, let me know.

Nigel

Great to have these Nigel.
A bit puzzled by the version of "The Balkan Hills" in volume 2, with virtually no snaps and both a G sharp and a G natural in the second last bar of each part. (I assumed it was a pipe tune: can pipers do that? Diatonic moothie players would certainly  struggle).
I recently got a different version from Trish Santer, which corresponds I think to how I have heard it played in Sandy Bell's (though that may not count for much).
I'll try to attach it here (as a JPEG).
[attachment=1]


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - John Kelly - 01-09-2016

Hi Alistair, your point about the G natural and G# both being in The Balkan Hills is an interesting one and I have seen this very often in many tunes where the original pipe tune is played by other instruments, such as the fiddle, and the G naturals are changed to G# by the players.  I think it may be an attempt to get the scale to suit the key - Pipes give the notes of A mixolydian mode whereas the key signature is D major with just the 2 sharps, the G# missing from the mode.  Pipe tunes written in D major can render the notes of this scale with the F# and C# whereas pipe tunes in A mix, starting/ending on an A note, still only have the two sharps, so do not allow the scale of A major to be played.  Pipers are clever in that they rarely put the key signature on their scores!

Many non-pipe tunes are conversely adapted by pipers, who have to play the G natural, as you say.  I am thinking of tunes like Rowantree in the key of A major  (pipers play the G natural in the second part of the tune) and there are many other Scottish favourites which pipe bands have added to their repertoires over the years.  The late Andy Stewart made a good living out of adding lyrics to well-known pipe tunes - A Scottish Soldier, Take me Back, etc, and if I recall the tunes were adapted with the G being sharp, but I might be in error here.


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - Alistair - 01-09-2016

(01-09-2016, 10:10 AM)John Kelly Wrote: Hi Alistair, your point about the G natural and G# both being in The Balkan Hills is an interesting one and I have seen this very often in many tunes where the original pipe tune is played by other instruments, such as the fiddle, and the G naturals are changed to G# by the players.  I think it may be an attempt to get the scale to suit the key - Pipes give the notes of A mixolydian mode whereas the key signature is D major with just the 2 sharps, the G# missing from the mode.  Pipe tunes written in D major can render the notes of this scale with the F# and C# whereas pipe tunes in A mix, starting/ending on an A note, still only have the two sharps, so do not allow the scale of A major to be played.  Pipers are clever in that they rarely put the key signature on their scores!

Many non-pipe tunes are conversely adapted by pipers, who have to play the G natural, as you say.  I am thinking of tunes like Rowantree in the key of A major  (pipers play the G natural in the second part of the tune) and there are many other Scottish favourites which pipe bands have added to their repertoires over the years.  The late Andy Stewart made a good living out of adding lyrics to well-known pipe tunes - A Scottish Soldier, Take me Back, etc, and if I recall the tunes were adapted with the G being sharp, but I might be in error here.

Many thanks John.
I would prefer if pipe tunes were not altered for other instruments, but I can understand why it happens.
As a diatonic (and dynamic) moothie player what is really annoying is when there are some G#s and some G naturals, especially in the same bar as here.
As you may know Hohner produced a "Highlander" double sided harmonica a few years ago, with D on one side and Amix (A but with G naturals) on the other. I bought one, but later discovered (realised?) that all unmodified pipe tunes can be played on a diatonic D harmonica (in what I think is called "cross-harp" mode among those who know about these things). Since this epiphany I have been relearning to play all the pipe tunes I know cross harp on a D, though I still resort to the Highlander sometimes, because it's so much easier. "When the Battle's O'er" is a good example. In the Caleerie Buskers it's unmodified, whereas in the Sandy Bell's moothie session we play it in "straight A" (not that I think anyone would notice).

(08-08-2016, 08:39 PM)nigelgatherer Wrote: In my idle moments I've put together two new digital books, the first two volumes of what I'm calling "Gatherer's Grand Collection". The contents are mostly in sets of two or three tunes, they're all Scottish, and they're all tunes I like. At the moment they only exist in standard notation, but mandiolin tab versions will appear at some point.

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the First

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the Second

Any problems with downloading, let me know.

Nigel

Another small query Nigel.
Tune 38 in Volume 1 ("Highland Cradle Song") is attributed to Scott Skinner, but I think this is not the Skinner tune, but a pipe tune of the same name, which we played for a slow march in the BB band I was a drummer in in the fifties, and for which I have always wanted to find the music. Don't know if it's traditional, or if not who wrote it.
There's a very nice rendering of Skinner's tune on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drM4STf1EiU
I have known this tune too for as long as I can remember, but don't have the music for it.


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - Alistair - 01-09-2016

(08-08-2016, 08:39 PM)nigelgatherer Wrote: In my idle moments I've put together two new digital books, the first two volumes of what I'm calling "Gatherer's Grand Collection". The contents are mostly in sets of two or three tunes, they're all Scottish, and they're all tunes I like. At the moment they only exist in standard notation, but mandiolin tab versions will appear at some point.

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the First

Gatherer's Grand Collection Volume the Second

Any problems with downloading, let me know.

Nigel

Just realised that tune number 81 in Volume 2 ("The Drummer") is a simplified version of the tune of the song "The Piper O' Dundee", with the dots removed and a slight variation in bar 3. (I'm comparing it to the music for Piper O' Dundee on page 136 of "Scottish Songs", Lomond Books 2006, edited by Chris Findlater and Mairi Campbell.)


RE: Gatherer's Grand Collection - nigelgatherer - 13-09-2016

"A bit puzzled by the version of "The Balkan Hills" in volume 2, with virtually no snaps and both a G sharp and a G natural in the second last bar of each part...".

You're right, Alistair. Like many tunes, I learned The Balkan Hills from a record, in this case from The Boys of the Lough. The way I play it is the way they played it - not the original pipe version. I guess I should have corrected myself years ago, but these early LPs I listened to made such an impression, it's difficult to dislodge these settings from my brain.

And The Highland Cradle Song... Again, you're right. I always absent-mindedly thought it was a folk-process rendition of Skinner's Cradle Song, but it's a different tune. I'll need to fix that. 

The Drummer: it's not a simplified version of The Piper o' Dundee, but the other way round: the song used the old reel as the basis of its melody. At the end of last year was 300th anniversary of the Battle of Sherrifmuir; the eponymous piper, Carnegie of Finhaven, was at the battle, but was reputed to have run away. Mind you, many people on both sides appear to have done the same thing. Both sides claimed victory, but it's generally thought that it was the point where the first Jacobite rebellion's ball was burst. Hundreds of Highlanders on the way home from Sherrifmuir burned the Perthshire towns of Auchterarder, Blackford and Crieff. Most of Crieff was destroyed.