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Abbreviations:
References: Contributors:
CRE: Ceol Rince na hEireann
DMI: O'Neill's Dance Music of Ireland (1907)
OMI: O'Neill's Music of Ireland ()
MFI: Bulmer & Sharpley, Music From Ireland, 4 vols (c1970s)
NF: The Northern Fiddler
K2v1-4: Kerr's Merry Melodies
K2v6: Kerr's Collection of Merry Melodies for the Piano
Ryan: Ryan's Mammoth Collection
NG: Nigel Gatherer
CMA: Caoimhín Mac Aoidh
PdG: Paul de Grae
PV: Philippe Varlet
BB: Breandan Breathnach
HH: Hal Hughes
DM: Don Meade
Last updated: 11th December 2004.

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Name Ryan Coles Notes
Bag of Meal, The 106 75 DM: O'Neill's title Banish Misfortune is now current.
Barney's Goat 69 HH: This is very close to Tommy Potts's well-known slip jig, The Butterfly, starting with the B part, then the A part, without Potts's C part.
DM: See notes for Skin the Peeler.
Belle of the Kitchen 102 72 DM: O'Neill's Paddy's Resource or Kitty of Coleraine. Now best known as The New York Jig or, in Cape Breton, as The Road to Skye.
Billy O'Rourke's 103 71 NG: Come Under My Plaidie
Billy Peterson's Fav 83 54 NG: Blackthorn Stick
CM/PW: Maid On the Green
DM: See notes for The Boys of Bockhill (Ryan p80)
Bobbing for Eels 108 76 DM: Jackson's Bottle of Brandy (or Claret), attributed to "Piper Jackson," the gentleman piper.
Boss, The 108 76 NG: Aka The Old Horned Sheep (DMI238) or The Humours of Donnybrook (K2v1p37).
Bottle of Brandy 82 53 CM/PW: The Leg of the Duck; Donal na Greine
DM: AKA Bully for You (Ryan p95), The Leg of the Duck or Dónal na Greine (Sunny Dan).
Boys of Bockhill 80 51 NG: The Blackthorn Stick
CM/PW: Maid On the Green
DM: AKA Billy Patterson's Favorite (Ryan p83), The Blackthorn Stick, similar to The Coach Road to Sligo (Killoran), The Boys of Rockhill (Joyce, Goodman collections), O'Neill's The Humours of Bantry.
Bridal, The 87 58 NG: The Priest's Leap
Brisk Young Lad's 106 74 NG: There Cam a Young Man
DM: O'Neill's Hurry the Jug is a set dance based on this jig.
Bully for You 95 65 NG: Leg of a Duck etc
DM: See notes for Bottle of Brandy.
Butcher's March 100 69 DM: Not the tune usually known by this name today.
Castle Garden 100 69 DM: Castle Garden on the Battery in Manhattan was, before Ellis Island, the main reception center for immigrants in New York City. Prior to that, it was a theater and, originally, a fort guarding New York harbor.
Catholic Boys 81 52 CM/PW: The Geese In the Bog (a floating title)
Close to the Floor 86 57 CM/PW: Father Tom's Wager [DMI220]
Come to the Raffle 84 56 Larry Mallette: Tongs By the Fire
CM/PW: Not composed by Hand as credited?
DM: The Tongs by the Fire [DMI185]
Come Under My Dimity 95 53 CM/PW: Come Under My Plaidie; Black Rogue; Rogaire Dubh
Come Under My Pladdie 81 65 DM: Dimity was a coarse cotton fabric most often used for bed clothes, which makes this a coarse invitation.
Croppies Lie Down 110 78 DM: The title of a sectarian Protestant song.
Custom House, The 110 78 NG: A variant of Humors of Glendart (DMI19), aka East at Glendart; Shins Around the Fireplace; Tim the Piper.
DM: See notes for Shins Around the Fireside (Ryan p107)
Diamond, The 93 63 DM: Relative of The Frieze Breeches [DMI260].
Drop of Whiskey, A 93 63 NG: Drops of Brandy [DMI448]
Drunken Ganger's, The 94 63 DM: Possibly a corruption of The Drunken Gauger (a name now used for a jig-time set dance), a gauger being an exciseman ("revenuer") charged with suppressing the distillation and sale of untaxed spirits.
Emon Acnuck 86 57 Michael Robinson: Bryan O'Lynn
CM/PW: This is a corruption of the Gaelic Eamonn a'Chnoic. The tune is not the same as the song by that title printed in Roche 3.
DM: Corruption of "Eamonn a' Chnuic" ("Ned of the Hill"), the outlawed Jacobite hero of several English and Gaelic songs. This tune is better known as Brian O'Linn.
Eviction, The 104 73 DM: O'Neill's Scatter the Mud.
Fasten the Wig On Her 81 52 CM/PW: Fasten the Leg On Her
Flaming O'Flanigan's 98 67 DM: Title of a song to this air, with the chorus: "Hooroo! whack! For that was the way with the Flaming O'Flannagans,
From the first illigant boys of that name,
For kissing and courting, and filling the can again,
Drinking and fighting like cocks of the game.
Hooroo! whack"
Frazer's 106 74 DM: O'Neill's Paddy From Portlaw.
Go To the Devil and Shake Yourself 81 52 CM/PW: When Sick Is It Tea You Want? [DMI358]
Gobby O, The 85 55 DM: This tune, which is in Ryan's, O'Neill and Kerr's I, served as the air for Wilkes and Liberty, an English song honoring the 18th century radical agitator John Wilkes. Jefferson and Liberty, Ryan's alternate title, was a later American song to the same jig tune.
Golliher's Frolic 86 57 CM/PW: Gallagher's Frolic
DM: A phonetic version of the Irish manner of pronouncing Gallagher's Frolic.
Good Morrow to Your Night-Cap 91 61 DM: Not O'Neill's Good Morning to Your Nightcap. Pádraig O'Keeffe's on Fisherstreet CD 'Out of the Night'.
Hills of Glenurchie 92 62 NG: Hills of Glenorchy; Jolly Corkonian
DM: Scottish original of the Irish song The Boys of Tandragee. Popular in Cape Breton Island.
Humour of Glen 82 54 DM: Thomas Leixlip the Proud or The Humours of Glynn, a harp tune or piping "piece."
Hunt the Fox 98 68 DM: The Foxhunters slip jig.
Hunting the Hare 109 77
Indeed! Then You Shant 111 79 DM: Lilted by Frank Quinn, the Longford fiddler, button accordionist and singer, on a 78 rpm disc.
Irishman's Heart to the Ladies 84 56 CM/PW: Sweet Biddy Daly [DMI278]
Jackson's Bottle of Brandy 111 79 DM: See notes for Bobbing for Eels (Ryan p107)
Joe Kennedy's 80 52 CM/PW: Hills of Glenorchy (one of many variants in Ryan's; others are noted as they appear. See also Apples in Winter and The Jolly Corkonian in O'Neill)
Johnny Hand's 100 69 DM: James and John Hand were apparently Boston fiddlers. Many tunes in Ryan's are attributed to "J. Hand".
Jolly Pedler's 105 74 Michael Robinson: I'm the Boy for Bewitching Them
Katy Is Waiting 83 54 CM/PW: Hills of Glenorchy variant
Kenmure's On and Awa' 105 73 DM: O'Neill's I Will If I Can. Kenmure's On and Awa' Willie in Kerr's I.
Lady Cawdor's 80 52 NG: Ride a Mile
Land of Sweet Erin 93 63 DM: AKA The Kinnegad Slashers [DMI148]; Brian O'Linn [K2v1p38].
NG: AKA The Twin Sisters [DMI].
Lanigan's Ball 99 68 DM: Title of a well-known song to this air.
Larry O'Gaff 89 59 DM: Larry O'Gaff was a comic song to this air, as was Daniel O'Connell or Making Babies by Steam, two other names often applied to this jig.
Lillibulero or The Protestant Boys 79 52 DM: This was a 17th century anti-Catholic comic song popular among the adherents of King William. The Protestant Boys is a later sectarian song set to the same air, which is still used as theme music by the BBC. That this tune was selected as the very first jig in Ryan's must have some significance!
Little Brown Jug 82 54 CM/PW: 2nd strain a variant of Tatter Jack Welsh
Little House Round the Corner 88 59 DM: Credited to "J. Hand." Paddy Reynolds recorded this as The Little Thatched Cabin.
Little House Under the Hill 87 58 DM: Recorded by James Keane as The Last Bus to Drimnagh. See Mysteries of Knock (Ryan p82).
Little Peggy 98 68 DM: Better known as Paddy Whack, from the song of that name. Chorus: "Di du mack whack, And where are ye from? The town of Ballyhack where seven praties weigh a ton."
Maggie Brown's Favorite 82 53 CM/PW: Planxty Brown (attributed to Carolan)
NG: (Miss) Margaret Brown's Favourite, claimed by Nathaniel Gow.
Maid on the Green, The 111 79 DM: See notes for O'Connell's Welcome (Ryan p99)
Moll in the Wad 58 HH: Kelly the Rake (O'Neill's)
Moll Roe In the Morning 80 52 CM/PW: Moll Roe
DM: Another setting of Moll Roe (Ryan p98).
Moll Roe's 98 68 DM: Another setting of Moll Roe In the Morning (Ryan p80).
Mysteries of Knock 82 54 DM: Villagers at Knock in Co. Mayo in 1789 claimed to have seen the Virgin Mary, whose shrine there is still a pilgrimage site. The tune is similar to The Little House Under the Hill (Ryan p87). Recorded as a banjo solo by Michael Gaffney of Leitrim in New York in the 1930s.
Night of the Fun, The 93 64 DM: The Old Dutch Churn (Ryan p109). AKA The Splashing of the Churn or A Fig for a Kiss in O'Neill's.
O'Connell's Welcome 99 64 DM: Version of The Maid on the Green (Ryan p111). This title is short for O'Connell's Welcome to Parliament, a name now attached to a different tune. Daniel O'Connell led the agitation for Catholic emancipation, the main result of which was to allow wealthy Catholics like himself to be elected to the British parliament.
Old Dutch Churn, The 109 77 DM: See notes for The Night of the Fun (Ryan p93).
Old Walls of Liscarrol 83 54 CM/PW: (not same as O'Neill's tune)
One Bottle More 96 66 DM: Old Man Dillon [DMI75]. AKA Mug of Brown Ale.
Over Land and Sea 98 68 DM: A version of the tune now more generally called Munster Buttermilk.
Paddy O'Caroll's 99 68 DM: A piping version of the fiddle tune now best known as Richard Brennan's (after a Sligo fiddler) from a 78 recording by Michael Coleman.
Paddy's the Boy 82 54 NG: Hartigan's Fancy; Humours of Enistymon
DM: Similar to Coppers and Brass (The Humours of Ennistymon).
Pandeen O'Rafferty 92 61 DM: One of many versions of Paidín (or Paudeen) O'Rafferty.
Pausteen Fawn, The 99 68 DM: A corruption of An Páistín Fionn (The Fairhaired Boy). The tune is played as a song air as well as a jig. The jig version is now often called Statia Donnelly's.
Pivot Brig, the 102 70 NG: The original is the Scottish jig Teviot Brig (K2v1p13)
Pothouge 80 51 CM/PW: Polthogue
Praties Are Dug, and
 the Frost is All Over
111 78 DM: Line from a song now associated with a different jig air.
Puss In the Corner 104 72 NG: AKA Lady Charlotte Murray's Fav (Gow coll); The Cat In the Corner (DMI129); O'Mahoney's Frolics (DMI190)
Rakes of Westmeath, The 96 65 DM: AKA A Blast of Wind (Paddy O'Brien, James Kelly & Dáithí Sproule LP).
Red Stockings 107 75 NG: Kick the World Before You (Alastair Anderson LP)
Riding on a Hand-Car 105 74 DM: O'Neill's The Eavesdropper.
Roaring Willie's 103 71 NG: Rattlin' Roarin' Willie (K2v3p25)
DM: From the song Rattling, Roaring Willie set to this air...
NG: ...by Robert Burns.
Shee La Na Quira 92 62 DM: Corruption of "Sile Ní Ghadhra" or "Sheela Nee Iyer," who symbolized Ireland in song.
Sheriff Muldoon's 99 65 DM: The Bowlegged Tailor [DMI131].
Shins Around the Fireside 107 75 DM: The Custom House (Ryan p110), O'Neill's East at Glendart. A different tune by this name, now a popular polka, is in Howe's 1000.
Short Grass 110 78 DM: A relative of Old John's (CRE1).
Skin the Peeler 103 72 DM: Same as Barney's Goat (Ryan p100). A "peeler" was a policeman, so named because the British constabulary was founded by Robert Peel. The now-popular Butterfly slip jig is a version reworked by fiddler Tommy Potts.
Skiver the Quilt 66 HH: The Ten-Penny Bit [DMI162].
DM: Kerr's I attaches this title to a version of a tune now called The Legacy. Skiver was leather made from split sheep skin, and to skiver meant to cut something to pieces in that fashion. Possibly, however, this is a mis-print for "Shiver the Quilt," the meaning of which is easier to deduce.
Spirits of Whiskey 92 62 DM: Three Little Drumers (Ryan p97).
Swallow-tail Jig 100 69 DM: AKA The Dancing Master.
Tell Her I Am 85 55 CM/PW: (Not as in DMI)
Terry Heigh 80 51 DM: O'Neill's Terry Heigh, Ho the Grinder.
Tivoli 60 HH: The Priest in His Boots
To Cashell I'm Going 103 72 DM: A three-part version of Tatter Jack Walsh, as it is more usually titled (O'Neill, Kerr's I).
Top of Cork Road 85 56 DM: The Rollicking Irishman in Kerr's I. Air to the song Father O'Flynn. The title track of Tommy Peoples' Shanachie LP 'The High Part of the Road' is a back translation into English of an Irish translation of "The Top of the Road" ("Ard an Bothar"), which Breandán Breathnach in Ceol Rince na hÉireann, vol 1 mistakenly applied to the preceding jig in Ryan's, a two-part version of The Blooming Meadows.
Trip to Galway 83 53 CM/PW: Hills of Glenorchy variant
HH: Come in from the Rain
Two and Sixpenny Girl 94 63 DM: Breathnach applied this title to a tune recorded by Joe Ryan and Eddie Clarke which, though similar in the first few bars, was actually a composition of West Cork whistle player Micheál O'Dwyer. Two shillings and sixpence was a half crown in pre-decimal British coinage.
Unfortunate Rake, The 89 59 DM: Included on Michael Coleman's 78 side Up Sligo.
Vaughan's Favorite 64 HH: Have a Drink on Me
Whiskey and Beer 87 58 Michael Robinson: Another Jig Will Do (DMI437)
Wink Of Her Eye 85 56 CM/PW: Bold John O'Leary. Not composed by Hand as credited?


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