Ceol Rince na hÉireann

IV

[The Dance Music of Ireland]

[IV]

[collected by]

BREANDÁN BREATHNACH

a thiomsaigh

[edited by]

JACKIE SMALL

a chuir in eager

First published 1996.

Edition used for this translation: same.

Translation of notes to tunes by Paul de Grae, March 2000.

Last update: October 2000.

(Work on identifying the untitled tunes is still in progress at time of last revision.)

NÓTAÍ

i dtaobh na bhFonn

[NOTES

regarding the tunes]

[DOUBLE JIGS]

1. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p35). It was Stephen Grier, fiddler and piper, Farnaught, County Leitrim, who wrote this important ms. in the years 1882 & 1883. It was loaned to Breathnach by John Flynn, Drumlish, County Longford.

2. An Bád go Béal Feirste: The Belfast Boat (Breathnach II, p28). The private collection made by Breandán Breathnach is the source for all the tunes here where his name is referred to.

3. Na Portáin sa Ghréiscphota: Crabs in the Greasepot (Grier III, p35).

4. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p69).

5. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p47).

6. Gan ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p12). With this note: 'From a ms. by Pádraig O'Keeffe from D. Cronin.' Pádraig's music may be found now on an RTÉ CD, The Sliabh Luachra Fiddle Master Pádraig O'Keeffe (RTÉ, CD174), and an edition of his music from the large supply of manuscripts he wrote for his fiddle pupils is expected shortly. Dennis Cronin was a fiddler from Ballyvourney, County Cork, who moved to Dublin. He was a friend and neighbour of Breathnach, and one of the musicians who provided tunes for CRÉ.

7. Port Bhriain Mhóir: Big Barney's Jig (Breathnach II, p27).

8. Rí na bPort: The King of Jigs (Breathnach II, p41). Four parts in this setting. Two parts in the setting in O'FPC and in Goodman (II, p35) under the title The Happy Mistake. In O'Neill with two parts: Miss Monroe (DMI, 98 & MI, 982); his second title for it (IM, 137), Mrs. Spens Monroe. Originally a Scottish jig.

9. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p37).

10. Leanbh mo Chroí: Lannamacree ["Leanbh mo chroí", lit., "child of my heart"] (Grier III, p44). Other names for this are Jackson's Babes and The Rose in Full Bloom.

11. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p65).

12. Eitilt na Lachan Fiáine: The Wild Ducks' Flight (Donnelly II). James McMahon, a musician [flute] from County Fermanagh, composed this. Liam Donnelly was the scribe, a fiddler born in County Tyrone who greatly helped Breandán Breathnach in his work collecting dance music. Donnelly spent his life working in Belfast, and was living in County Antrim at the time of his death in 1992.

13. Leag an Táilliúir: Tumble the Tailor (Breathnach II, p29).

14. Is Olc an Ghaoth nach Séideann do Dhuine Éigin: It is an Ill Wind that Blows Nobody Good (Grier III, p67).

15. Port Bhean de Ros: Mrs. Ross's Jig (Breathnach II, p27).

16. Port Shéamais Mhic Mhathúna: James McMahon's Jig (Donnelly II). Composed by James McMahon, County Fermanagh.

17. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p30). A version of this is called The Humours of Strand Road. It would remind you of The Top of Cork Road or Father O'Flynn in places.

18. Port an tSagairt: [The Priest's Jig] (unknown ms.). A version of Happy to Meet and Sorry to Part (DMI, 78) [and CRÉ II 28].

19. Buachaillí Bhaile Uí Scalaigh: The Boys of Ballyscally (Bogue IV, 49).

20. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p30). A simple pleasant tune that would be very suitable for beginners.

21. Sméid i Leataobh Í: Wink Her Aside (Gunn).

22. Triall Mhic Shiacais ar Luimneach: Jackson's Walk to Limerick (Gunn). Among the jigs related to this are The Geese in the Bogs (DMI, 279) [and CRÉ II, 53], Morrison's Fancy (WSGM, 197) or The Castlebar Races as it is now better known, and 'Nóra Chríonna' (DMWC, 152). This tune with just the first two parts as The Humours of Glin in PTT, number 52. Breathnach has a list of a dozen titles for this jig in his article Piper Jackson (Éigse Cheol Tíre 2, 1976: reprinted in The Man & His Music: An Anthology of the Writings of Breandán Breathnach, Na Píobairí Uilleann, 1996).

23. Gan ainm: Anon. (Reid). From a ms. Breathnach got from Seán Reid, written by Brother Gildas O'Shea (1882-1960), a piper from Ballinskelligs, County Kerry. Gildas was a school teacher, a member of the De La Salle order, a close friend of Seán Reid to whom he sent a great deal of old music. Breandán Breathnach knew Brother Gildas in his [i.e., Breathnach's] youth: an account of him written by Breathnach in his article The Pipers of Kerry (Éigse Cheol Tíre 4, 1985: reprinted in The Man & His Music: see number 22).

24. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p37).

25. An Fhliúit Eabhair: The Ivory Flute (Donnelly II). Composed by James McMahon, County Fermanagh.

26. Cóiste Fostaithe Mhic Shiacais: Jackson's Post-Chaise (Gunn).

27. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p42). Called Brosnahan's Frolics in County Kerry.

28. Aoibhneas Laura: Laura's Delight (Donnelly II). Composed by James McMahon, County Fermanagh.

[SLIP JIGS]

29. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, pp34/35).

30. Port Rois: Portrush (Bogue IV, p35).

31. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier I, p28).

32. Cailíní Phort Láirge: Waterford Girls (Bogue IV, p35). Related in the first part to The Sail Around the Rocks (FC, 25).

33. An tSeamróg: The Shamrock (Bogue IV, p33). Related to no. 32.

34. Seo libh, a Mhná, chun Tae! Ladies, Step up to Tea! (Grier IV, p36).

35. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p40) [A setting in D is called Paddy Hiúdaí's on James Byrne's album The Road to Glenlough (Claddagh 4CC 52), track 2a, named for his father's cousin Paddy Hiúdaí Byrne; that setting was recorded by Altan as James Byrne's on their album The Red Crow (thanks to Marcus Metz for pointing this out)]. Called a quickstep in the ms.

36. An Turas go Yorkshire: Yorkshire Trip (unknown ms.).

37. Gan ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p44). Up wi't Ailly Now (Aird 1, p47). Another name for it is The Irish Frolick.

38. An Bhiomlóg: Gimblet (unknown ms.). The same in WCCD III, p20.

39. Port na Buaiceála: The Swaggering Jig (Breathnach II, 328). This name is often used for jigs but, as far as I know, this jig is not the same as any one of those with the same name that are currently in print. Related in the first part to number 47 here, The Rakes of Drumlish.

40. An Dochtúir Loinge: The Ship Doctor (Breathnach).

41. Tá Seáinín i ngrá le Mailí: Johnny Loves Molly (Breathnach I, 190). Breathnach has a note with this saying that he found it in a ms. written by Wm. Jos. King between 1860 and 1880.

42. M'anam go nDéanfad, arsa an Fidléir: O Faith Then I Will, Says the Fiddler (Grier IV, p61).

43. Caith an tSlis Léi: Throw the Beetle at Her (Grier IV, p33).

44. Liom Féin Amháin mo Bheansa: My Wife's My Own (Grier IV, p33). This is not the same as the jig I Have a Wife of my Own in DMI.

45. Port na Mumhan: The Munster Jig. (Grier III, p130).

46. Sleaschéim an Promenade: Promenade (Breathnach II, p3). A note with this in the ms. says, 'Ml. Coleman who danced as he played this tune. Wm. Clancy 4/2/'57'. It is not found on any recording made by Michael Coleman (1891-1945), however. Breathnach wrote this jig into his own ms. from a ms. he got from Seán Reid (1907-1978), who lived in Ennis, County Clare, but who was born in Castlefin in County Donegal. Seán Reid was a piper and fiddler who played piano with the renowned céilí band that was, and is, in Tulla in County Clare. The reference [above] is to the piper Willie Clancy. This jig is on a record, Irish Jigs, Reels and Hornpipes (Folkways FP6819), issued in the mid 1950s, as Promenade Side-Step: Michael Gorman - an excellent fiddler from County Sligo who spent his life in London - was the musician: Willie Clancy is co-performer on this record, which was re-issued by Topic Records in London in 1958. Coleman and Gorman had the same music teacher in County Sligo, the fiddler James Gannon. This beautiful jig is found on many releases, among them an LP by Kevin Burke and Mícheál Ó Domhnaill, Promenade (LUN 028, Mulligan 1979; re-issued on CD, LUNCD 028).

47. Réiceanna Dhroim Lis: The Rakes of Drumlish (Grier III, p34).

48. Carr Cliathánach do Sheisear: Jaunting Car for Six (Bogue IV, p34). Another name for this is Follow Her over the Border. Related to Drops of Brandy.

49. Ag Trasnáil na Caoile: Crossing the Channel (Bogue IV, p36).

[SINGLE JIGS and SLIDES]

50. An Cailín Déirí: The Dairy Maid (Grier IV, p11). Single jig. This is not the same as the one with the same title in MI.

51. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p89). This is a slide. Breathnach wrote this tune - and all the others tunes below which refer to the name Collins - into his own ms. from a ms. written by or in the possession of David Collins, Abbeyfeale, County Limerick, and which Breathnach got from Tom Barrett, fiddler from Listowel, County Kerry, who was one of the musician who provided tunes for CRÉ II.

52. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier IV, p37). Single jig.

53. Boic Bhaile Átha Cliath: The Bucks of Dublin (Bogue IV, p51). Single jig.

54. Port Mhicí Uí Mhurchú: Mickie Murphy's Jig (Breathnach II, p27). Single jig. Related to Yellow John (MI, 1832 & 1833); 'Seán Buí' [= preceding title] in DMWC, 35.

55. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p94). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms. See number 51.

56. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p93). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms. See number 51. Related to ''Chailleach, do Mhairís Mé' [Oh hag, you have killed me] (DMWC, 49).

57. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, p63). Single jig.

58. Na Beacha sa Chrann Silíní: Bees in the Cherry Tree (Donnelly II). Single jig. This tune is from James McMahon, County Fermanagh.

59. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p12). Single jig. Originally from a ms. Breathnach got from Seán Reid. A note with it: 'From Wm. Clancy 11/1/'57 who got it from Jn. Potts who got it from Tom Rowsome'. All of these musicians were pipers, of course.

60. Parlús Pheait: Pat's Parlour (Breathnach II, p28). Another name for it is Green Jerseys. It is related to The Auld Inn (Kerr IV, p28).

61. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p93). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms. See number 51. Bridgie Murphy, a member of the famous musical family in Sliabh Luachra and sister of Denis Murphy and Julia Clifford, used to have a version of this. It is also played as a polka.

62. An Coileach Comhraic: The Game Cock (Breathnach II, p90). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms; untitled in the ms. See number 51. As a strathspey, Captain Francis Wemyss (Kerr III, p3). The Game Cock as a reel in RMC, whence the title here. Another name for it is Those Evening Bells Reel. Related to The Western Lasses (DMI, 765). It is played as a reel in Sliabh Luachra [see CRÉ V, 158, from Denis Murphy and Mollie Murphy]: Breathnach recorded it from the fiddler Jack Connell (or Jack the Lighthouse, as he was better known, from the townland where he lived). Jackie Daly, the renowned accordion player from Kanturk in County Cork, composed an extra part for it: he calls the entire reel The Bog Carrot, which he has put on a record (Buttons and Bows: Green Linnet SIF 1051; now on compact disc GLCD 1051).

63. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p96). Single jig. Breathnach got this from the accordion player James Gannon, from Streamstown, County Westmeath.

64. Port Mhig Sheanlaoich: Ganley's Jig (Bogue III, p210). Single jig. Untitled in the Bogue ms.; title from a recording which Tommy Hunt made of the brothers Larry and Michael Joe McDonagh, flute and fiddle, Ballinafad, County Sligo.

65. Bóthar na gCloch: Stony Batter (Grier IV, p44). Single jig [unrelated to the slip jig of the same name in CRÉ I, 63].

66. An Uile-Íoc: The Perfect Cure (Breathnach II, p96). Another single jig from the accordion player James Gannon (see number 63). Under the same title in Westrop, p6. Called The Perfect Cure (The Long Dance) in FTB, p46. As a slide in Kerry: untitled from Seán Ó Duinnshléibhe, melodeon, on the CD 'Beauty an Oileáin: Music and Song of the Blasket Islands' (Claddagh Records, CC56CD, track 8b). Another name for it is Long John's Wedding [see the jig of that name, DMI 233, MI 1018, which is in A; the first part is the same, but the second is different; likewise Long John's Wedding March, WSGM 79, which is in G].

67. Stróic ina Ghiobail É: Tear It to Rags (Grier IV, p33). Single jig.

68. Básaítear na Lachain Lá Nollag: The Duck Die on Christmas Day (Bogue III, p210). A single jig for a quadrille. The County Clare flute player Micho Russell used to have a version of this which he called a Cudreel [i.e., quadrille].

69. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p95). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms. See number 51.

70. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier IV, p34). Single jig.

71. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p95). This is a slide, originally from the David Collins ms. See number 51.

72. Croith na Piseanna: Rattle the Peas (Grier IV, p7). Single jig.

73. Port Shéamais Mhig Fhionnáin: James Gannon's [Jig] (Breathnach II, p86). Another single jig from the accordion player (see number 63).

74. Mailí ón Longfort: Molly from Longford (Reid). Single jig, untitled in the ms. This is from Brother Gildas; see the note on Gildas under number 23 above. There is a note with this jig which says that Gildas got it from O'Mealy. Richard Lewis O'Mealy (1875-1946) was a piper and pipe-maker, who was born in County Westmeath and who moved to Dublin, Cork and Belfast during his life. The jig is printed in the newsletter of Na Píobairí Uilleann, An Píobaire, volume 2, number 2; more widely known as a reel, Molly from Longford, which was played by the piper Patsy Tuohey (1865-1923); that reel printed by O'Neill (WSGM, 308) from a ms. of Tuohey, and in PPT, 7, from a recording made by the outstanding piper. Tuohey was born near Loughrea, County Galway: he spent most of his life in America. Another version of this jig as a reel, Pay the Girl Her Fourpence (DMI, 804).

[POLKAS]

75. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p90). Breathnach wrote this into his own ms. from the David Collins ms. 7/9/1958, as with all the other polka here except number 92. See number 51.

76. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p88). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

77. Brúigh Isteach liom, a Shiobháinín: Shove into Me, Siobháinín. (Breathnach II, p91). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

78. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p93). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. Related to the air Fowney, which the accordion player Breandán Ó Beaglaoich, from Corca Dhuibhne in County Kerry, plays on the cassette 'Seana Choirce' (Gael-Linn CEFC 123).

79. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p94). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

80. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p89). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

81. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p88). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

82. De Bharr na gCnoc is in Imighéin: Over the Hills and Far Away (Breathnach II, p88). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. Untitled in the ms. The English name here from a song which Anna Lyons (Dublin) used to sing for children, with this chorus:

When I was young I had no sense,

I bought me a fiddle for eighteen pence.

And the only tune that it would play

Was 'Over the Hills and Far Away'.

In Northumbria as chorus of the song Wee Geordie has Lost his Plinker (a plinker means a marble). It is a simple melodious tune, well suited to beginners.

83. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p89). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. Related to the chorus of the song Finnegan's Wake.

84. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p91). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

85. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p93). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. [Recorded by The Billy Clifford Trio on their 1970s Topic LP as the first of two Upperchurch Polkas; the track is re-issued on the CD The Rushy Mountain - Classic Music from Sliabh Luachra, a compilation from various Topic LPs.]

86. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p88). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

87. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p92). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. In a ms. from County Kerry as 'A Sett of Quadrills - No 2'.

88. Pólca mo Mháithrín: Mamma's Polka (Breathnach II, p91). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. Untitled in the ms.: the English name here from a ms. from County Cork.

89. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p88). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

90. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p92). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51. [Tom Barrett calls this Johnny Box.]

91. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p93). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

92. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier). In a ms. from County Westmeath as Osborn Quadrilles - No 5.

93. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Breathnach II, p92). Originally from the David Collins ms. See numbers 75 & 51.

[REELS]

94. An Buachaill sa Chrann: The Boy in the Tree (Wade). Jack Wade (1913-1967) was a piper who was born in Dublin, spent his youth in north County Dublin and in County Meath, and was living in Clones, County Monaghan, when he was killed in a car accident. A note with this tune, 'Pat Carney, Longford'.

95. Tae Glas: Green Tea (Breathnach III/Bogue). This tune and the others with the same source reference come from copies Breandán Breathnach made in his own ms. of tunes in Bogue's ms.

96. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p56).

97. Cat na Crimlinne: The Crimlin Cat (Donnelly II). From fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

98. Mairéad Nic Shiacais: Margot Jackson (Wade). There is a note with this tune which says that Jack Wade got it from Owen McCague, musician from County Fermanagh.

99. Iníon Uí Chasaide: Miss Cassidy (Donnelly II). From James McMahon, County Fermanagh.

100. Na Maolaitheoirí: The Dimmers (Grier II, p38).

101. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Wade). Related to A Fair Wind to Greenland (Kerr IV, p5).

102. Teachíní Ghort na gCloch: The Rockfield Cottages (Grier II, p41). This is a reference to a place very near to Grier's house - 'Newpark', Gort Leitreach, Farnaught, County Leitrim.

103. Dul Faoi na Gréine: The Setting of the Sun (Sheahan).

104. Cuimhní ar an gCeis: Memories of Kesh (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

105. Peata Mhamaí: Mammy's Pet (Breathnach III/Bogue). See number 95. This is not the same as number 189 - which has the same title - although one could say that there is some connection between them. This reel is now known as The Lilies of the Field, the title of a version of it on a record by Frankie Gavin and Paul Brock ('Ómós do Joe Cooley', Gael-Linn CEF115; now on compact disc CEFCD 115). The original recording of the reel played by Gavin and Brock was made by one of the great traditional musicians of the 1920s in America, P. J. Conlon (accordion player from Milltown in County Galway). Conlon recorded it on a record from the Columbia company in New York in 1929, under the title Kitty in the Lane. [Compare also McDonagh's (1), CRÉ III, 113.]

106. Timpeall an tSeomra: All round the Room (Grier I, p.13). Grier has another setting in the key of D with this note: 'All around the Room, Reel, for Pipes'. Another name for it is The Light Horseman's Reel.

107. Ríl Uí Bhógáin: Bogan's Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

108. Peaidí a' Chláir: Paddy from Clare (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

109. Slán leis an bhFraoch: Farewell to the Heather (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

110. Gearrchaile an tSabhaircín: The Primrose Lass (Breathnach III/Bogue). See number 95. This is not the usual reel with this title.

111. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan). Related to McFadden's Favourite (DMI, 716).

112. Ríl Chiarraí: The Kerry Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh. A version of 'An Claíomh i Láimh' or The Sword in Hand (CRÉ, 144 & PTT, 14).

113. An Bóthar Nua: The New Road (Reid) Untitled in Seán Reid's ms. A version of DMI 523, whence the title. On a record made by The Raymond Roland Quartet (Raymond Roland, Vincent Griffin, Liam Farrell and Kevin Taylor) in London in 1965, Saturday Night at the Céilí (Ember 3361): the title there is Fahy's Reel. The reference is to the fiddler Paddy Fahy, from Kilconnell in east County Galway, who has made so many fine tunes.

114. An Líon faoi Bhláth: The Flax in Bloom (McDermott II, p7). Dated '17th March 1937'. This is a very common reel (DMI, 633) which is given here because of the third part in this fine setting from the fiddler Michael ('The Master') McDermott. He was a schoolteacher in Pomeroy, County Tyrone, who moved to Carrigmore in the same county after he retired from work, and lived there until his death in the year 1947.

115. Ríl Nua Iníon Mhic Leoid: The New Miss McLeod (Grier II, p49). This reel is not related to the usual reel called Miss McLeod.

116. Tá Jack Beo: Jack's Alive (Grier II, p49).

117. Aimsir Aerach na Cásca: The Merry Days of Easter (Madigan, p98). This is not the same as the reel of the same name in DMI. This one is related to The Jolly Pigeons (GE, p71).

118. Pléaraca Eadarnaí: The Humours of Ederney (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh. John Doherty, the renowned Donegal fiddler, used to play this tune.

119. Ríl an Mháistir Mhic Dhiarmada: Master McDermott's Reel (McDermott II, p23). An authoritative version here: this reel was composed by the fiddler Michael ('The Master') McDermott, Pomeroy and Carrigmore, County Tyrone. A note with it, 'Composed May 1943' [it is, however, sometimes attributed to Seán Maguire and Liam Donnelly]. There is a note about him under number 114. A very popular much sought-after tune: among the musicians who have recorded it are Josephine Keegan, under the title McDermott's (OAS 3030, Outlet); Tommy Peoples, under the title The New Policeman on A Traditional Experience with Tommy Peoples (SOLO 7012); and the group Buttons and Bows, as McDermott's on Gracenotes (Gael-Linn CEFCD 151). Printed in IT (Master McDermott's, p12) and as McDermott's in McN, p10 [it is also known as Barrel Rafferty.]. Previously printed by Breandán Breathnach (Ceol, vol. 3, no. 1) as McDermott's Reel from the flute player Johnnie Maguire (County Fermanagh). Breathnach himself had the opinion that this is a version of The Boys of the Lough.

120. Aisling Mháire: Mary's Dream (Reid). Originally from a ms. which Seán Reid made available to S. A. Henderson, dated 11 April 1889.

121. Teach Bhaile an Chuain: Harbourstown House (Wade).

122. An Saol ar Fad i nGrá Liom: All the World Loves Me (Madigan, p92).

123. Teach Annesbrook: Annesbrook House (Wade). A note with it saying that Jack Wade got this from T. Clifford.

124. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier I. p4). Related to The Baltimore Reel (Ceol, vol. 1, no. 4, from the fiddler John Kelly). Another version of it is called Lady South's Reel.

125. Spéirbhean an Locha: The Lady on the Lake (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh. Another name for this is The Speedy Roasted Fadge: fadge means small round cakes made of potato.

126. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p54).

127. Ríl an Tiarna Banff: Lord Banff's Reel (Grier II, p51). In Scotland as a strathspey. It is unusual to see a reel in E major, like this one, but some musicians - particularly fiddlers - like to have the occasional one as a challenge.

128. Iníon Ní Choiligh: Miss Cox (Wade). Another version of the next tune.

129. An Bóthar Iarainn: The Rail Road (Grier II, 281). Another version of number 128. A version of this is Rose Mary (JCLAS, 78).

130. Ríl Chaoimhín Uí Mhathúna: Kevin Mahon's Reel (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

131. Ríl Thiarna Dhroim an Fhiolair: Lord Mounteagle's (Breathnach III/Bogue). See number 95.

132. Duilliúr an Fhómhair: The Autumn Leaves (Breathnach IV, p6). Related to The Man of the House (DMI, 642), Ginley's Fancy (CRÉ III, 130), Paddy Carthy's Reel (PFR, p3) and Handsome Sally (Ceol, vol. 3, no. 1, from Johnnie Maguire).

133. (i) Ríl Uí Chatháin: Kane's (Breathnach III/Bogue). (ii) Colún Nelson: Nelson's Pillar (Grier, p13). Two settings of this tune, the first one from County Fermanagh or from Tyrone and the second one from County Leitrim. Second title for (i), McCanny's: see number 95.

134. An Tuíodóir Aerach: The Merry Thatcher (Wade). Jack Wade's note on this: 'The above reel was a favourite of Arthur Kelly, flute player, from Ring Common, Co. Dublin. Kelly is about 40 years dead and was a good friend of Jimmy Ennis, Naul, Co. Dublin, present Séamus Ennis's father.' There is no date on the note but it is probable that he wrote it during the 1960s. This tune is not the same as the one with the same name in CRÉ II.

135. Tabhair Amach agus Taispeán don Saol Í: Take Her Out and Air Her (Donnelly I). Donnelly got this tune from the fiddler Paddy Nugent, Pomeroy , County Tyrone [as Kennaw's Reel (and other names) in CRÉ III, 126, and untitled in CRÉ II, 279].

136. Siamsaíocht an Rianaigh: Ryan's Rant (Grier I. p95). Possibly Hime was the writer's source, so similar are the two settings. Title from Hime: Ray's Rant in Grier. This is a simple version of a four-part tune titled Ryan's Rant in KCC. Grier has another setting beginning on the note G, a more convenient setting for pipers and flute players. This is also called The Merry Dancer.

137. Ríl an Bháicéara: The Baker's Reel (Breathnach I, 120). [Recorded by east Galway fiddle and accordion player Rose Murphy as The Whistler and His Dog on Milltown Lass (originally published by Topic Records in 1977, re-issued by Ossian in 1989, OSS-21).]

138. Mailí Nig Uidhir: Molly Maguire (Grier II, p41). This is not the same as Molly McGuire in RMC.

139. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan).

140. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p54).

141. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Reid). A note with it says that Seán Reid got this reel from Mrs. O'Loughlin, n January 1948. Mrs. O'Loughlin (1885-1958), Eileen O'Connell from Lissycasey before her marriage, was a neighbour of his on the Gort Road in Ennis in County Clare. She was a versatile musician but mostly played fiddle and concertina. The four tunes here from her, this one and numbers 148, 179 and 209, are samples of a beautiful old style.

142. Seán Ó Comhaltáin: John Colton (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh. The man referred to in the title was a dancer.

143. Meaigí Shámhánta: Drowsy Maggie (McDermott). Every traditional musician knows the basic version (DMI, 622). This interesting setting from fiddler Michael ('The Master') McDermott, Pomeroy and Carrigmore, County Tyrone, has two more parts than the usual setting.

144. Ríl Leaicí: Lackey's Reel (Breathnach IV, p5). With a note saying that it was collected from Tom Kearns, musician.

145. Ríl an Tincéara: The Tinker's Reel (Sheahan). This tune is not the same as the one with the same title in DMI.

146. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p57). A version of this is The New Line to Dublin (JCLAS, 35).

147. An Bairille Braiche: The Barrel of Wash (Donnelly I). Donnelly got this from the fiddler Paddy Nugent, Pomeroy, County Tyrone.

148. Ríl Uí Sheachnasaigh: O'Shaughnessy's Reel (Reid). 'Mrs. O'Loughlin'. See the note on number 141 above.

149. Ríl Dharach: The Reel of Darragh (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh. It is a version of Mullingar Races (DMI, 750).

150. Clogra Ledlow: Ledlow's Chimes (Wade). Another name for it is Derry Brae.

151. Ríl Thaimí Mhic Giolla Dhuinn: Tommy Gunn's Reel (Donnelly II). Donnelly got this from the Derrylin, County Fermanagh fiddler referred to in the title.

152. Gearrchailí Bhaile na Leargadh: Ballinalarkey Maids (Wade).

153. Ríl Iníon de Buitléir: Miss Butler's Reel (McDermott I, p14).

154. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p56).

155. Peaidí Spórtúil: Sporting Paddy (McDermott I, p19). This is not the same as the usual reel of the same title (CRÉ, 133).

156. Ríl Newpuck: The Newpuck Reel (Grier II, p41).

157. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan). Titles for versions of this are The Prince of Wales's Reel and Where Are you Going, my Pretty Maid?.

158. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan).

159. Buachaillí Meidhreacha Bhaile Fhobhair: The Merry Boys of Fore (Wade).

160. Ríl an Ghlaslocha: The Glasslough Reel (McDermott I, p21).

161. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan).

162. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan).

163. Rogha Sheáin Uí Cheallaigh: John Kelly's Favourite (Breathnach I, 78). Composed by John Kelly (1912-1989), the well-known fiddler and member of Ceoltóirí Chualann, who was born in Rehy West, between Carrigaholt and Kilbaha in the west of County Clare, and moved to Dublin early in his life.

164. Ríl an Doire Mhóir: The Derrymore Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

165. Na Pantalúin Ghorma: Blue Pantaloons (Madigan). A simple reel suitable for beginners.

166. An Chloch Aoil: The Limestone Rock (Breathnach III, p42). A fine setting of the common reel (CRÉ, 113); from the accordion player Sonny Brogan: with a note, Sonny 23/6/'63. Sonny Brogan was from Dublin; he made records in the 1930s with The Lough Gill Quartet and was a member of Ceoltóirí Chualann under the direction of Seán Ó Riada. This reel was previously printed by Breathnach (Ceol, vol. 1, no. 2). On record by the group The Chieftains (The Chieftains, Claddagh Records, re-issued on compact disc CC2CD).

167. Sméideadh na Meidhre Maisí: The Lovely Lassie Winking (Grier II, p41). A different name in County Longford, Jenny Got a Clinking.

168. Gearrchailí Luimnigh: The Limerick Lasses (McDermott). In print (LJAS [correction: JCLAS], 91) as Over the Bridge to Beeta; as an untitled reel in FC, 50 (from a ms. from Bray, County Wicklow); and as a highland, The Merry Wives, by Ed Reavy (CCER, 123) [though not actually composed by him]. In County Westmeath as Over the Bridge to Betty. Very popular with Donegal fiddlers: their usual title is Con McGinley's, as it is called by James Byrne on his CD The Road to Glenlough (Claddagh Records, CC52CD); under the same title by the group Altan on Blackwater (Virgin CDV2796). Other names for it in Donegal are 'Baintreach Mná' [The Widow] and 'Ríl Shingil Pheadair Uí Ighne' [Peter hIghne's Single Reel].

169. Ainnir an Ghleanna: The Maid of the Glen (Breathnach III/Bogue). See number 95.

170. Áine Mhaiseach: Lovely Anne (Donnelly II). This is from James McMahon, County Fermanagh. A version of The Rainy Day (DMI, 473).

171. Ríl Uí Dhufaigh: Duffy's Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

172. Iníon Mhic Aonghusa: Miss McGuinness (Donnelly II). From James McMahon, County Fermanagh. This is not the usual reel of the same title [for which see CRÉ I 121].

173. Camchuairt an Chonnachtaigh: The Connachtman's Rambles (Sheahan). This is not related to the double jig which is the usual bearer of this name.

174. Ríl Uí Chonaill: O'Connell's Reel (McDermott). In print (JCLAS, 57) as The Night of the Fun. John P. Blessing's Favourite in Treoir (vol. 6, no. 5). On a record by the group Buttons and Bows ('Buttons and Bows', Green Linnet, SIF 1051; reissued on CD as GLCD 1051) as Charlie Harris's, from the name of the musician from whom they got it, the accordion player from County Limerick now living in Ardrahan, County Galway.

175. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Wade).

176. Is Álainn go Deo mo Ghrása: My Love is Such a Fair One (Wade). A version of The Flower of the Flock (DMI, 512).

177. An Fiaire Feá: The Rover (Grier II, p42). [Dublin Lasses (CRÉ I 193); Tie the Ribbons (CRÉ III 179).] This is related to Dowd's/O'Dowd's Favourite (see another version at number 178 below). This reel here is a version of Murtough Molloy (DMI, 741). Names of other related tunes are The Flowers in May, The Ladies' Pantaloons and The Scotch Hunt. A version of this was called Dublin Lasses by Denis Murphy, eminent fiddler in the Sliabh Luachra tradition: this does not refer to the tune of the same name in DMI.

178. Ríl an Tí-Rí: The Tee Ree Reel (Wade). Related to Dowd's Favourite /Reel (B&S II, p5; and PFR, p9). Michael Coleman called thisat reel O'Dowd's Favourite (in honour of a fiddler from his home neighbourhood in County Sligo) on a record he made in New York around 1921: re-issued on Michael Coleman 1891-1945 (Gael-Linn / Viva Voce, CEFCD 161).

179. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Reid). With a note: 'Mrs. O'Loughlin 11/1/'48.' See the note on number 141 above.

180. Bóthar Chluain Meala: The Road to Clonmel (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

181. Ríl Mhic Chárthaigh: Carthy's Reel (Wade). This tune is from Tom Matthews. Matthews was a musician in Greenanstown in County Meath, whom Jack Wade knew in his [Wade's] youth, and who played the uilleann pipes as well as many other instruments.

182. Ríl Uí Raghallaigh: Riley's Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

183. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Reid). To Seán Reid from Brother Gildas. (See the note on Gildas under number 23 above.) This tune is related to The Four Courts (DMI, 640).

184. An Tiarna Mac Dónaill: Lord McDonald (Wade). This Scottish reel is widely known as part of the Irish repertoire (DMI, 649: CRÉ III, 200). This is a nice simple setting suitable for instruments - such as the uilleann pipes and whistles, for example - which do not have a sufficiently wide range for playing the usual setting.

185. Óinsiúlacht Shinéad: Jenny's Folly (Wade). With a note, 'Late A Kelly (flute), Ring Commons, Co. Dublin.'

186. Ealaín an Tincéara: The Tinker's Occupation (McDermott I, p20). Related to The Jolly Tinker (DMI, 751). Versions of this tune are on a record 'A Friend Indeed' (Shanachie Records, 290913; now on CD, 34013) by Liz Carroll, fiddler from Chicago, under the title Johnny Doherty's Yellow Tinker; and by Máirtín O'Connor, accordion player from Galway, under the title The Jolly Tinker on his record The Connachtman's Rambles (Mulligan, LUN 027; compact disc LUNCD027).

187. Mórthimpeall an Domhain: Round the World (Donnelly II). This is from the fiddler Tommy Gunn, Derrylin, County Fermanagh. A version of The Jolly Tinker (DMI, 751).

188. Ríl Sheáin Potts: John Potts's Reel (Wade). This refers to John Potts (1871-1956), the piper from Wexford who spent most of his life in Dublin. Breandán Breathnach learned uilleann pipes from him: he dedicated the first volume of Ceol Rince na hÉireann in honour of John Potts.

189. Peata Mhamaí: Mamma's Pet (Donnelly I). This is from the fiddler Paddy Nugent, Pomeroy, County Tyrone. See number 105, a different tune with the same name,

190. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, pp55/56).

191. An Duilleog Bhán: The White Leaf (Wade). With a note, 'This is the old way of playing it. It is played quite different now like many more.' The Mason's Apron is a version of this: it is probably to that reel and its popularity in the 1960s that Jack Wade was referring in his note. Another setting of this reel here is The White Leaf (B&S IV, 26). See number 192.

192. Práiscín an Tincéara: The Tinker's Bib (Wade). A version of The White Leaf, number 191, q.v. This one is sometimes called The Green Leaf.

193. Gan Ainm: Anon. (McDermott). Another example of his own compositions from the fiddler Michael 'The Master' McDermott, Pomeroy and Carrigmore, County Tyrone.

194. Ríl Mhig Eochaín: McGuckian's Reel (McDermott).

195. Geataí Móra Annesbrook: The Grand Gates of Annesbrook (Wade). With a note that says that Jack Wade got it from a ms. of Pat Ward (1847-1928) - a piper who was born near Drumconrath, County Meath, but spent his life in Drogheda, County Louth. 'This reel starts like 'The Maid in the Cherry Tree'. But do not judge it by the first two bars. It is a completely different reel. JW.' Related to The Swallow's Tail (DMI, 536),

196. Gearrchailí Naomh Barra: The Lasses of St. Barry's (Madigan). Another name for it is Lady Baird's reel. Related to Lady Baird's Strathspey (RMC, p242).

197. Mo Ghrása idir Dhá Rós: My Love between Two Roses (Grier II, p46).

198. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier II, p54).

199. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Reid). Martin Rochford, piper and fiddler, from Bodyke, near Feakle in County Clare, supplied this reel to Seán Reid.

200. Teach Ashmolean: Ashmolean House (Donnelly II). Composed by the fiddler Tommy Gunn, Derrylin, County Fermanagh. Available on the CD The Invasion (Green Linnet, GLCD 1074) by the piper Jerry O'Sullivan (with Séamus Egan and Mick Moloney on this track).

201. Sráid Bolton: Bolton Street (Grier II, 268).

202. Gearrchaililí Thír na Sceach: The Tirnaskea Lasses (McDermott II, p23).

203. Ríl Uí Fhriseal: Frazer's Reel (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

204. Tabhair Casadh sa Luachair Di: Roll Her in the Rushes (Madigan). This was recorded, untitled, by Michael Coleman - the most renowned musician ever in Irish folk music - in New York in the year 1927: re-issued on Michael Coleman 1891-1945 (Gael-Linn / Viva Voce CEFCD 161; disc 1, track 7b).

205. Ansacht Uí Dhúgáin: Dougan's Fancy (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

206. Rogha an Phíobaire: The Piper's Favourite (Donnelly II). From the fiddler William Jones, County Fermanagh.

207. Rogha an Chollóra: Dowser's Favourite (Wade). With a note saying that Wade got this from the piper Pat Ward: 'Pat Ward's brother, a fiddler, was called the Dowser Ward. This was one of his favourite reels. Pat - not knowing its name - called it 'Dowser's Favourite'.' Wade has this reel twice: his second setting is called The Four Knocks, with a note, 'Late T. Matthews, Co. Meath'. There is a note on the musician Tom Matthews under number 181 above.

208. Ríl an Stáitse: The Stage Reel (Wade). Related to number 207 here. Also related to Maeve's Reel, composed by the fiddler Jim McKillop, from County Antrim, and to be found on the record Mist in the Glen (Outlet SOLP 1045, reissued on compact disc PT1CD 1045). Maeve's Reel is also found as Jim McKillop's from the fiddler Seán Smyth - from Straide, County Mayo - on the CD The Blue Fiddle (Mulligan, LUNCD 060).

209. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Reid). With a note, 'From Mrs. O'Loughlin 3/1/'48'. See the note on number 141 above. This could be played as a hornpipe also.

[HORNPIPES]

210. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 163).

211. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 20).

212. Cornphíopa Thomáis: Thomas's Hornpipe (Grier I, p8).

213. An Mhaidhdeog: The Pivot (Sheahan).

214. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 22). Called Miss Lacey's, Miss Lucey's and Mona's Delight.

215. Cornphíopa Uí Loingsigh: Lynch's Hornpipe (Bogue IV, 47).

216. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 11).

217. Cornphíopa Ghréagóra: Gregory's Hornpipe (Grier III, 7).

218. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 9).

219. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 3).

220. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan).

221. Cornphíopa na Lorgan: Lurgan Hornpipe (Bogue IV, 53 & 75). Coldier's Hornpipe is Bogue's name for his second version of it.

222. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Sheahan II, p8). He calls it A Splendid Hornpipe. A version of The Honeysuckle (DMI, 874).

223. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 13).

224. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 72).

225. Gan Ainm: Anon. (Grier III, 23).

NA LÁMHSCRÍBHINNÍ

a bhfuarthas na foinn astu

[THE MANUSCRIPTS

from which the tunes were taken]

(Additional information in the notes concerning the tunes).

[tune numbers omitted here]

Bogue Bernard Bogue, County Monaghan and County Tyrone (beginning of 20th century)

Breathnach Breandán Breathnach, Dublin (middle of the 20th century)

Collins David Collins, County Limerick (the second half of the 19th century)

Donnelly Liam Donnelly, County Tyrone and Belfast (middle of the 20th century)

Gildas Brother Gildas O'Shea, County Kerry (the first half of the 20th century)

Grier Stephen Grier, County Leitrim (end of the 19th century)

Gunn John & Tommy Gunn, County Fermanagh (the second half of the 20th century)

McDermott Michael ('Master') McDermott, County Tyrone (middle of the 20th century)

Madigan James Madigan, County Limerick (middle of the 19th century)

Reid Seán Reid, County Clare (middle of the 20th century)

Sheahan Dan Sheahan, County Kerry (the second half of the 19th century?)

Wade Jack Wade, County Monaghan (middle of the 20th century)

SCAOILEADH NA NODANNA

[KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS]

Aird 1 James Aird, A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs. Adapted to the Fife, Violin, or German Flute. Vol. 1 (Glasgow 1782).

B&S I-IV Dave Bulmer & Neil Sharpley, Music from Ireland, Vols. 1-4 (Lincolnshire, 1974-1976).

CCER Joseph M. Reavy, The Collected Compositions of Ed Reavy (1984. Reprint 1996).

Ceol Breandán Breathnach, editor, Ceol (traditional music magazine, Dublin, 1963-1986).

CRÉ Breandán Breathnach, Ceol Rince na hÉireann

(Dublin 1963. Reprints 1972, 1974, 1977, 1983).

CRÉ II Breandán Breathnach, Ceol Rince na hÉireann Cuid 2

(Dublin 1976. Reprints 1982, 1992).

CRÉ III Breandán Breathnach, Ceol Rince na hÉireann Cuid 3 (Dublin 1985. Reprint 1995).

DMI Francis O'Neill, The Dance Music of Ireland (Chicago 1907. Reprint 1965, etc.).

DMWC Pat Mitchell, The Dance Music of Willie Clancy (Dublin and Cork, 1976. Reprint 1993).

FC Arthur Darley & P. J. McCall, Feis Ceoil Collection of Irish Airs, Vol. 1 (Dublin 1914. Reprinted as The Darley & McCall Collection of Traditional Irish Music, 1984).

FTB Peter Kennedy, The Fiddler's Tune-Book (Oxford 1951. Reprint 1994).

GE Donncha Ó Briain, The Golden Eagle (Dublin 1988. 2nd edition 1993).

Goodman Manuscripts of James Goodman I-IV, in Trinity College, Dublin

(collection made in the mid 19th century).

Hime Forty Eight Original Irish Dances never before Printed with Basses for the

Piano-forte and with Proper Figures for Dancing (Dublin, undated).

IM Francis O'Neill, O'Neill's Irish Music (Chicago 1915. Reprint 1987).

IT Seán McGuire and Josephine Keegan, Irish Tunes by the 100, Vol. 1

(Lincolnshire 1975).

JCLAS Rev. L. Donnellan, C.C., 'Oriel Songs and Dances', Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society. Vol. II, No. 2 (Dundalk and Dublin, 1909).

KCC Kerr's Caledonian Collection (Glasgow 1914).

Kerr I-IV Kerr's First/ Second/ Third/ Fourth Collection of Merry melodies for the Violin

(Glasgow, undated).

McN Pat McNulty, A Collection of the Dance Music of Ireland

(Glasgow 1965. 4th edition 1991).

MI Francis O'Neill, O'Neill's Music of Ireland (Chicago 1903. Reprints 1964, 1979).

OFPC O'Farrell, Pocket Companion for the Irish or Union Pipes. Vol. 1 (London, c. 1810).

PFR Play Fifty Reels with the Armagh Pipers Club (Armagh 1982).

PPT Pat Mitchell & Jackie Small, The Piping of Patsy Tuohey (Dublin 1986).

RMC William Bradbury Ryan, Ryan's Mammoth Collection (Boston 1883. Reprint 1995).

Treoir Treoir (music magazine of Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann, Dublin 1968- ).

WCCD Caledonian Country Dances, Being a Collection of All the Celebrated Scotch Country Dances now in Vogue, ... Printed and Sold by I. Walsh ... at ye Harp and Hoboy ... Strand

(London, undated).

Westrop T. Westrop, editor, T. Westrop's 120 Country Dances, Jigs, Reels, Hornpipes, Spanish Waltz, etc. for the Pianoforte (London, undated).

WSGM Francis O'Neill, Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (2nd edition, Chicago 1922. Reprint 1980).